What Happens in a Lesson?

Usually a lesson is one to one and lasts about 45 minutes.

The number of lessons needed varies from person to person.  People can benefit from half a dozen when they can start to see changes. Others get hooked and want to carry on as they get more interested in their progress.  The benefits continue long after you have stopped coming to lessons.

The Alexander Technique is not a treatment or a therapy, although it can be very therapeutic.  It’s called a lesson because you are learning the skills and self-awareness to look after yourself.

There are no exercises, machines or special clothes.

The Alexander Technique is taught with a combination of explaining and gentle hands-on guidance rather than manipulation.  It’s not so much something you learn as something you unlearn – habits you’ve acquired over a lifetime that you’re not even aware of.

Most of us don’t realise how much of our lives we spend on auto-pilot.  Being able to get through everyday tasks without even thinking or noticing how we’re doing them helps us go through life quickly and efficiently and enables us to concentrate on more complex demands.  That’s useful but the habits which are doing us harm need to be jettisoned.

Most lessons include table work in which you lie on a table fully-clothed in the classic Alexander Technique semi supine position which allows the maximum rest for the spine.

The aim is to learn a new skill that you can incorporate into everything you do. Lessons are tailored to your specific needs.  Musicians can bring their instruments.  You can think about how you work on a computer, carry a baby or a back pack, rehearse for a presentation, or swing a tennis racket.

After lessons people often say they feel taller, lighter, energised and above all more comfortable and calmer.

It is suitable for people of all ages and levels of fitness.

chop-1      chop-2

drink-1      drink-2

phone-1      

text2-img      text-img

 

Photography by www.levililyphotography.com

 

“Elizabeth helped me in so many ways to understand how to use my body and the woman who walked in hunched and aching and stiff on her first appointment strode out and walked across Golders Hill park as if she were forty years younger.”